SarChasm

Grand Canyonby Sarah at ProgressiveKid

Today I was lucky enough to have a lesson about sarcasm, and I’m not saying that at all sarcastically. Earlier in the day I confess that I might have emphasized my words differently. But I’ve since had an epiphany.

Because of our articles on artificial turf, among other things, on a ledge is linked to and cited in a number of turf-specific locations on the Internet, including the site of one well-known periodical with what I had believed to be (and may indeed be, with a few exceptions) a following of crunchy greenies and back-to-the-earth types. The link was part of a Q&A page featuring a question about the safety of using rubber tire planters.

Imagine my surprise a few weeks ago when the Q&A received a comment from a woman who succinctly and in no uncertain terms ravaged my article purely on the grounds that I am a fiction writer: Continue reading

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Eight Potential Pitfalls of Parentthink (Home Turf Disadvantage II)

Thomas the Trainby Sarah at ProgressiveKid

In the course of fighting to keep artificial turf out of a local park, I have been witness to a number of thinking errors that parents seem to make, whether those parents are blue, red, green, or in between. It’s as if, by virtue of being parents, either through lack of sleep or increased imprisonment behind the wheel, our thinking gets muddled and we can only see the forest (parenting) and not the trees (kids). (Feel free to choose your own improved metaphor.)

Here are the Eight Potential Pitfalls of Parentthink as I see them: Continue reading

Home Turf Disadvantage

Grassby Sarah at ProgressiveKid

(Full disclosure: I am not a housewife, not that there would be anything wrong with that in my opinion, but some folks level the term irresponsibly as a way to discredit my opinions on turf, so let’s be clear about that; what I am is simply a professional writer who has written on a wide range of topics and who knows how to read the research of professional scientists and summarize it in an article for the rest of us to read.)

As a former soccer player well acquainted with the hazards of sand-based soccer fields in the rainy Northwest, I can appreciate a soccer club’s frustration and desire to do something to improve playing conditions for its members. I know only too well the taste of a mouthful of muddy water and the sinking feeling of seeing a perfectly timed pass floating in a small pond halfway to its intended destination.

All across the nation, more and more high schools, colleges, and park districts are installing artificial turf fields with the hope that they will be spared skid marks, puddles, and mudbaths. While improving upon some aspects of the situation, their choice creates other far more serious negative consequences, including potentially adverse health effects. Specifically, artificial turf exposes players, park users, and neighborhood residents to known inhaled carcinogens and dangerous bacteria and introduces the threat of aquifer and water supply contamination to the area. Continue reading